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Five Quick Facts about Cleaning with Hydrogen Peroxide.

Five Quick Facts about Cleaning with Hydrogen Peroxide.

Five Quick Facts about Cleaning with Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide isn’t just for cleaning cuts.

This inexpensive all-natural household item is normally found with the first aid kit, but you will also want to add one to your cleaning supply kit.

Hydrogen Peroxide – When most people think about hydrogen peroxide, they think about the liquid substance that creates bubbles while it is disinfecting the cut on your finger. Although this isn’t recommended as much nowadays (hydrogen peroxide may produce scarring and kill skin cells) it sure does disinfect a lot of things around your home. For almost 100 years it has been used as an antiseptic but did you know five quick facts about cleaning with hydrogen peroxide?

Five Quick Facts about Cleaning with Hydrogen Peroxide.

1. Hydrogen Peroxide is similar to water.

Hydrogen peroxide is chemically very similar to water (H2O) except it has one extra oxygen atom making its chemical formula H2O2. It breaks down into water and oxygen. The bubbles that form when you use hydrogen peroxide are from the oxygen.

2. Hydrogen Peroxide is a powerful disinfectant.

Much like lemon, hydrogen peroxide is very, very Anti.

  • Antibacterial
  • Antifungal
  • Antiviral
  • Antiseptic
  • Antimicrobial

Hydrogen peroxide is such an effective disinfectant it can be used to sterilize surgical tools. It can also sterilize your household cleaning supplies (scrub brushes, mops, rags, etc.).

3. Hydrogen Peroxide is actually a natural bleach.

Hydrogen peroxide is outstanding in the laundry room. Use it on your whites as a nontoxic, safe alternative to chlorine bleach. It will also remove any bad smells from your clothing, towels, and sheets. Caution: Do not use on your colors until you have first tested it on a colored piece of fabric.

4. Hydrogen Peroxide’s brown bottle.

If you ever wondered why hydrogen peroxide is always in a brown bottle, it’s because it keeps out the light. Hydrogen peroxide needs to stay away from light sources, or it may break down and lose its potency. If you are going to be cleaning with hydrogen peroxide, leave it in the bottle until you are ready to use it.

5. Our bodies produce Hydrogen Peroxide.

Hydrogen peroxide is formed in our cells to ward off the dangerous compound superoxide. According to Joe Schwarcz,  an enzyme called “superoxide dismutase” converts superoxide into hydrogen peroxide. Then the enzyme catalase reduces hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. So in a way, hydrogen peroxide disinfects our cells. To learn more about this process, read Joe Schwarcz’s full article here.  

Bonus Fact:

The earliest use of hydrogen peroxide was to bleach straw hats in the early 1900s.

If you haven’t read our last “five quick” post about lemon, check it out here.

Cleaning with Hydrogen Peroxide
Cleaning Grout with Hydrogen Peroxide.

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